Easter egg crafts – How to DIY your Easter eggs

March 1, 2017 (Last Updated: March 2, 2017)
Easter egg crafts - How to DIY your Easter eggs

Let the humble egg take centre stage in these simple but beautiful crafts; a pretty (and slimming) alternative to the chocolate Easter egg.

Sticker decal eggs

Sticker decal eggs

Stickers and varnish are all it takes to transform plain eggs into eye-catching beauties.

Difficulty level: EASY

YOU WILL NEED

assorted eggs
bamboo skewers
drawing pins
insect, butterfly or bird stickers
sheets or image transfers
1 medium soft-bristled paintbrush
1 small pot découpage matt varnish
1 styrofoam sheet

METHOD

Working with one egg at a time, insert a drawing pin into the top and bottom of the egg to make a small hole at each end. Insert the bamboo skewer into both holes on either end to enlarge them. Blow on one side of the egg to force the yolk and white out (keep this for scrambled eggs or omelettes). Wash and dry the egg well. Peel the sticker from its backing and apply onto the egg, sticking slowly from one side to the other to eliminate air bubbles and crinkles on the stickers. For transfers, peel off the transfer coating. Position the transfer on the egg and, using a blunt object such as the back of a teaspoon, gently rub over the transfer until it adheres to the egg and comes off the backing paper. If the stickers are not sticking to the egg, use a small amount of crafter’s glue on the end of a toothpick to paint underneath the sticker and push down until stuck.

Using the paintbrush, apply the varnish in one direction in a thin layer to cover the sticker and egg.

Place the pins in the styrofoam sheet to hold the eggs while they are drying.

When dry, apply several more layers of varnish, alternating the brushstroke direction each time so as to eliminate streaking.

Tissue découpage eggs

Tissue découpage eggs

Tissue paper or paper napkins lend a beautiful transparent effect to eggs when découpaged. Use a variety of designs in one colour to create a striking effect.

Difficulty level: EASY

YOU WILL NEED

patterned tissue paper or paper napkins (preferably with a white or pale-coloured background)
assorted natural or naturally dyed eggs of your choice, blown out, washed and dried
1 medium soft-bristled brush
1 pot Mod Podge
scissors
sewing pins
1 styrofoam sheet

METHOD

Wipe the surface of the eggs with a dry, soft cloth to ensure an even, clean shell.

Separate the tissue layers and use the thin top ply that features the design print. Carefully cut out sections of the tissue, leaving only a small rim around the design. Cut as close to the design as possible.

Using the paintbrush, apply Mod Podge to a small square of the egg. Apply the tissue sample to the area and smooth down with your fingers. Using the brush, continue to paint around the design, ensuring it is glued down. Paint over the design with more Mod Podge until the white part of the tissue turns transparent and only the inked design is visible.

Place the pins into the styrofoam to create a stand for the wet egg to dry on. When dried, apply a layer of Mod Podge to the egg, using even brushstrokes in the same direction. Allow each layer to dry completely before painting 2 – 3 more layers over each other, each in a different uniform direction to eliminate brush streaks and until the egg has a smooth finish.

Naturally dyed eggs

Naturally dyed eggs

Natural dyes are not only safe but produce a range of subdued hues. Simply open your fridge and spice cupboard – a palette of pretty colours awaits!

Difficulty level: EASY

YOU WILL NEED

2 cups water
1 tsp white vinegar
1 large chopped beetroot (pink) or
1 cup crushed blueberries (blue) or
1 tbsp ground turmeric (yellow)
1 tsp salt
assorted herbs or leaves (coriander, sage, small ferns and flowers work well)
white chicken or duck eggs, blown out, washed and dried
1 pair of old pantihose
scissors
string or elastic bands
1 small paintbrush
crafter’s glue or wood glue
empty glass jars
1 pot Mod Podge or découpage varnish

METHOD

Begin by making the natural dyes: place the water and vinegar in a saucepan over medium heat, and add the beetroot, blueberries or turmeric. Simmer gently
for 20 minutes before adding the salt. Repeat the process to create a batch of each dye. Combine the turmeric and blueberry dye to make green.

Cut small leaves from herbs to fit onto the eggs. Paint the leaves with a small amount of wood glue or crafter’s glue. Stick the leaves on the egg shell. Allow the glue to dry fully for best results.

Cut a small 10cm section of pantihose. Place the egg in the pantihose and stretch the nylon tightly over the egg. Using string or rubber bands, collect and twist the nylon tightly at the back of the egg and tie securely to ensure the plant decal cannot shift, peel off or move during dying.

Decant the prepared natural dyes into glass jars. Gently lower the nylon-wrapped eggs into the dye until fully submerged. Leave the eggs in the dye for 20 – 30 minutes. When the egg is the desired shade, rinse under running water.

Remove the pantihose gently, then gently peel off the plant leaves and rinse again. Pat the egg dry with a soft towel.

Using the paintbrush, gently apply an even coat of varnish over the eggs in one direction to seal in the dye, as it tends to fade and dull over time. Allow each coat to dry before applying the next. Apply a minimum of 3 coats in varying brushstroke directions to avoid streaking and to achieve an even finish.

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